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Towns and villages
The Yorkshire Dales and the surrounding area

 

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Austwick
Austwick is another attractive, typical dales village, with a small green and a public house (Gamecock Inn), and grey stone cottages surrounded by hills and fields encompassed with dry stone walls. The name derives from Nordic origins meaning Eastern settlement.

Barbon
Barbon is probably one of the quieter villages in the area. Situated on a back road from Kirkby Lonsdale to Dent, it was made even quieter by the closing of its railway station on a now disused branch line that linked the Leeds to Lancaster railway.

Chapel-le-Dale
The most visited place at Chapel-le-Dale has got to be The Old Hill Inn on the B6255. Walkers and cavers use the public house, and the car park can be used for a small fee as a parking place to ascend either Ingleborough or Whernside, being equidistant between the two.

Clapham
Clapham, along with Austwick, is now by-passed by the A65, which has helped to create a beautiful tranquil setting of a village split by Clapham Beck. The houses of the village line the leafy Beck along with a memorial to Queen Victoria.

Dent
Dent lies in its own valley of Dentdale and is served by only one minor road. Within the centre itself are narrow cobbled streets lined with old terraced cottages. There are two public houses in the centre, the Sun Inn and the George and Dragon.

Giggleswick
The most well known sight in Giggleswick is the green copper dome of the chapel of the public school, which is seen by many whilst driving up the A65. The public school was founded in 1507 and was granted a Royal Charter in 1553. Two of its more recent famous alumni include Russell Harty and Richard Whiteley. In 1927 its observatory was used to observe an eclipse of the sun. The school is now a co-educational boarding and day school.

Horton-in-Ribblesdale
Horton's main attraction is as the starting place for many walks, including being the official starting place of the Three Peaks Walk. Pen-y-ghent Cafe, which is also a tourist information centre, is the starting point of the Three Peaks Walk, where participants can clock out and clock back in after completing the 24-mile walk. Those who complete the route within 12 hours, qualify for membership of the Three Peaks of Yorkshire Club.

Ingleton
Ingleton is one of the most visited of the Dales villages, and lies alongside the A65. It has been popular with walkers since the eighteenth century, standing at the centre of three peaks country. The waterfalls walk must be one of the most popular walks in the country, and the limestone landscape with its many subterranean systems attracts cavers from far and wide. The advent of the railway brought visitors from around the country, and even though trains no longer pass through Ingleton, the coming of the motor vehicle ensured a continued supply of visitors.

Kirkby Lonsdale
The market town of Kirkby Lonsdale is encircled by the surrounding fells of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and has been described by John Ruskin as having one of the best views in England. The place itself is set just off the main A65 road and remains a traditional market town full of Georgian buildings, where life revolves mainly around the central market square, where a market is held every Thursday.

Settle
Settle, a market town about one mile off the A65, sits in the shadow of the imposing 300 foot limestone Castleberg Crag and one of the 21 viaducts along the course of the Settle to Carlisle Railway. The town used to be a stop off point for travellers going from York to Lancaster, but now is more famous for being the start of the Settle-Carlisle railway line. It was granted its market charter in 1249 from Henry III.

Stainforth
The stepping-stones over a small beck by the village green provide a delightful centre to this village. In the centre of the village is St Peter's Church, which dates from 1842, the Craven Heifer Public House and a public car park.

 

Copyright © Walks4all Limited 2022

Towns and villages
The Yorkshire Dales and the surrounding area

Austwick
Austwick is another attractive, typical dales village, with a small green and a public house (Gamecock Inn), and grey stone cottages surrounded by hills and fields encompassed with dry stone walls. The name derives from Nordic origins meaning Eastern settlement.

Barbon
Barbon is probably one of the quieter villages in the area. Situated on a back road from Kirkby Lonsdale to Dent, it was made even quieter by the closing of its railway station on a now disused branch line that linked the Leeds to Lancaster railway.

Chapel-le-Dale
The most visited place at Chapel-le-Dale has got to be The Old Hill Inn on the B6255. Walkers and cavers use the public house, and the car park can be used for a small fee as a parking place to ascend either Ingleborough or Whernside, being equidistant between the two.

Clapham
Clapham, along with Austwick, is now by-passed by the A65, which has helped to create a beautiful tranquil setting of a village split by Clapham Beck. The houses of the village line the leafy Beck along with a memorial to Queen Victoria.

Dent
Dent lies in its own valley of Dentdale and is served by only one minor road. Within the centre itself are narrow cobbled streets lined with old terraced cottages. There are two public houses in the centre, the Sun Inn and the George and Dragon.

Giggleswick
The most well known sight in Giggleswick is the green copper dome of the chapel of the public school, which is seen by many whilst driving up the A65. The public school was founded in 1507 and was granted a Royal Charter in 1553. Two of its more recent famous alumni include Russell Harty and Richard Whiteley. In 1927 its observatory was used to observe an eclipse of the sun. The school is now a co-educational boarding and day school.

Horton-in-Ribblesdale
Horton's main attraction is as the starting place for many walks, including being the official starting place of the Three Peaks Walk. Pen-y-ghent Cafe, which is also a tourist information centre, is the starting point of the Three Peaks Walk, where participants can clock out and clock back in after completing the 24-mile walk. Those who complete the route within 12 hours, qualify for membership of the Three Peaks of Yorkshire Club.

Ingleton
Ingleton is one of the most visited of the Dales villages, and lies alongside the A65. It has been popular with walkers since the eighteenth century, standing at the centre of three peaks country. The waterfalls walk must be one of the most popular walks in the country, and the limestone landscape with its many subterranean systems attracts cavers from far and wide. The advent of the railway brought visitors from around the country, and even though trains no longer pass through Ingleton, the coming of the motor vehicle ensured a continued supply of visitors.

Kirkby Lonsdale
The market town of Kirkby Lonsdale is encircled by the surrounding fells of Lancashire and Yorkshire, and has been described by John Ruskin as having one of the best views in England. The place itself is set just off the main A65 road and remains a traditional market town full of Georgian buildings, where life revolves mainly around the central market square, where a market is held every Thursday.

Settle
Settle, a market town about one mile off the A65, sits in the shadow of the imposing 300 foot limestone Castleberg Crag and one of the 21 viaducts along the course of the Settle to Carlisle Railway. The town used to be a stop off point for travellers going from York to Lancaster, but now is more famous for being the start of the Settle-Carlisle railway line. It was granted its market charter in 1249 from Henry III.

Stainforth
The stepping-stones over a small beck by the village green provide a delightful centre to this village. In the centre of the village is St Peter's Church, which dates from 1842, the Craven Heifer Public House and a public car park.

 

Copyright © Walks4all Limited 2022